Who is the Narwhal?

factualfeminist:

legally-bitchtastic:

sourcedumal:

lady-yuna:

2srooky:

mockingatlas:

prismatic-bell:

Can we just stop and talk about this for a minute?

Thresh doesn’t make an alliance. Thresh doesn’t waste time liking her. Thresh knows that either he must kill her or she must kill him for one of them to win.

But this is the only way he can repay her for protecting Rue when he couldn’t. It’s the only way he can repay her for honoring Rue when he couldn’t. He honors her by sparing her friend, the girl who would have died for her.

The revolution really doesn’t start with Katniss.

It starts with Rue.

SOMEBODY FINALLY SAID IT

This is exactly the point I’ve been trying to make for years. Okay, so the revolution gets it’s kindling with Katniss. She volunteers, well that’s new, she rebels in the display of talents by shooting the apple. This triggers her perfect score, okay. These aren’t really “Revolutionary” though. 

It’s not even revolutionary when Peeta professes his love, because, let’s face it, the rules of the game haven’t changed. They’re still just two kids who would have to KILL each other to win. Without a doubt, it would bring some interest to the games, so the Capitol makes propaganda about it. The “Star Crossed Lovers” in a game of life and death.

But what changes the game is Rue. Right away from her introduction in the books we know Rue is going to be somewhat of a big deal. She was compared to the most important character to Katniss, Prim, so that’s a huge indicator. She’s small, young, she’s what Prim would have been.

So Katniss instantly feels a subconscious pull toward her. 

When they meet in the trees, Katniss could have killed Rue easily, and Rue probably could have pulled a sneak attack or alerted the Careers of Katniss’s presence. Instead, Rue points out the Tracker Jacker nest.

Then it escalates, Rue and Katniss become an odd team, they’re an alliance, which is never new in the Hunger Games, as forming teams and then betraying them at the end seems to be a common, but there’s is different. It’s close, it’s sisterly, protective.

And then Rue get’s impaled. Katniss kills her first tribute with ease after that. Comparing it to hunting game. Katniss holds Rue, she cries, and then she sings. She sings for Rue a song of promised safety and warmth, something completely absent in the arena. 

And this is where the metaphorical canon fires. Katniss could have left Rue, the hovercraft would have been along to pick her up, but she can’t. She’s morally obligated to love this girl as much as possible. And this is where the revolution starts. 

She honors the dead. She honors a dead tribute from a district she’d never seen, a person she’d known for only a short period of time. But she throws away Hunger Games norms. She rejects them completely.

In the Hunger Games you’re supposed to kill mercilessly and leave the victims for the plain box they’re shipped home in. 

Katniss gives Rue a funeral in the Games, she decorates the body, she makes it look like Rue is sleeping. Like no harm had come. Katniss just ignited the coals that Rue had placed.

Rue’s District sends a parachute. Homemade bread. 

Then Thresh kills Clove and distracts Cato by taking his bag. 

The fire is going now, and the actions in Catching Fire are even more obvious.

The Speech for Rue. Peeta’s painting. Everything eludes back to this one little girl who became Katniss’s family.

So the revolution never started with Katniss, she was just the tinder for Rue’s ignition. 

Rue was the real Mockingjay.

Also, who’s four note whistle is constantly attached to the trailers?

Rue’s whistle.

Rue is omnipresent in the books and movies, and I absolutely love it.

The rebellion was started because the innocence of a black girl was defiled.

That is a powerful statement that a lot of people gloss over for this book

I’m not crying, okay? YOU’RE crying!

This is Fucking amazing.

yall-mothafuckas-need-misha:

badassbitchfromhades:

freckledtrekkie:

doctorsherlocklokison:

captainmjolnir:

I’ve never understood the stereotype that women are more likely to faint at blood

I mean seriously

what do you think we do every month

THEY WEREN’T SUPPOSED TO KNOW ABOUT THE WEREWOLF THING

AWH COME ON GUYS THAT WAS A SECRET FOR A REASON

I guess we have to come clean about the cult sacrafices too huh

image

Well now we do

dci-or-die:

atbronsonflint:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.
My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.
My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.
My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.
My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.
My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.
My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.
The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.
In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.
Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.
I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.
This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.
Never forget.
"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

This👍

When I was in first grade, I had already been reading chapter books and doing times tables and stuff along those lines. One day, we were reading a story from our textbook, and it was just too easy. I went up to her after we read and kindly asked for a harder book. The response I received was “Pretend it’s hard.” As a 7 year-old first grader, I asked my parents to take me out of school. And that’s why I highly support virtual school, because everything I learned in 6 years of virtual school, I’m re-learning now back at a public high school!

dci-or-die:

atbronsonflint:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.

In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.

Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.

I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.

This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.

Never forget.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

This👍

When I was in first grade, I had already been reading chapter books and doing times tables and stuff along those lines. One day, we were reading a story from our textbook, and it was just too easy. I went up to her after we read and kindly asked for a harder book. The response I received was “Pretend it’s hard.” As a 7 year-old first grader, I asked my parents to take me out of school. And that’s why I highly support virtual school, because everything I learned in 6 years of virtual school, I’m re-learning now back at a public high school!

renamonkalou:

by designer John Guild

renamonkalou:

by designer John Guild

Orlando, who was dining with Leonardo DiCaprio at the Cipriani restaurant on Wednesday night, was very, very angry, when Justin, who didn’t have a reservation at the eatery, approached their table to try to talk to the actors.

DiCaprio had proceeded to shoo away the pop singer with his hand, leading Bieber to provoke a fight which saw Bloom jump over a sofa to get at the 20-year-old Baby singer at the restaurant.

(x) this just keeps getting better

dicaprio had proceeded to shoo away the pop singer with his hand

image

god, bieber is such a prick

(via mrsweasley)

pastel-cutie:

People are already getting excited about Halloween and by people I mean me

sirtophatthethird:

wayfaring-mermaid:

specialagentofthelamb:

This woman deserves a round of applause and a throne of gold. This is the most realistic & amazing thing for someone to say for this generation of students. I wasn’t able to go to college this year because my parents can’t afford to send me and I had every scholarship, grant, loan known to man and it still wouldn’t work. Finally someone gets it!

Preach!

WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR PEOPLE TO REALIZE THIS?!

SO MANY OTHER COUNTRIES EITHER PAY FOR THEIR POPULATIONS’ EDUCATION OR JUST WRITE OFF THE BILL IF DOESN’T GET PAID FOR.

THE WAY THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM WORKS IS BACKWARDS AND MANGLED.

rouxfully:

doctor-pie:

party don’t start til i walk in.

This hasn’t been on my dash in way too long.

rouxfully:

doctor-pie:

party don’t start til i walk in.

This hasn’t been on my dash in way too long.

Never be afraid to apologize to your child. If you lose your temper and say something in anger that wasn’t meant to be said, apologize. Children need to know that adults can admit when they are wrong.

American Humane Society (via maninsun)

This is so, so important.

(via foundbysara)

Although I’ve never attended a Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, I always loved the idea of a female-centered musical space, where women of all shapes, sizes and backgrounds could gather to enjoy the music that shaped so many of our queer/feminist identities. What has never made sense to me or many of my queer feminist friends is Michfest’s attempt to exclude trans women from this celebration.

While the organizers continue to insist that excluding trans women is not an official policy, their “intention” that the festival cater exclusively to “womyn born womyn” serves to further marginalize trans women, denying them access to one of the only exclusively female spaces in our society.

Trans women and ciswomen (another word for non-trans women) suffer under the same patriarchal oppression, similarly restrictive ideas of what it means to be a woman, and the same structural barriers that deny women control of their own lives and bodies. The festival attempts to provide a refuge from this; to exclude some women from this refuge is simply inexcusable.

Beth Sherouse, HRC Senior Content Manager | The Human Rights Campaign and Equality Michigan both released statements this week on the trans-exclusionary policy of the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, which only allows “womyn born womyn.” This rule has been around for a while, but EQMI has launched a new campaign to bring it down, and other organizations are chiming in. Damn right.  (via gaywrites)

theartoftransliness:

realtalksexadvice:

kabutocub:

Ok, so I figured that perhaps not everyone is aware that this is available to use now, especially the younger folk out there.

This is OraQuick, and it is an FDA-Approved, in-home HIV test that provides results in about 20 minutes. I’m not sure about the availabilty of this product (or similar ones) in other countries, but in the U.S. you can purchase these at Walgreens for a mere 35 bucks, and you can even have them delivered to your door for complete anonymity.

Reading the results is easy. One line you are negative, two lines you are positive.

image

Why is this important? Well I know for a fact that a lot of guys say they are HIV negative without really getting tested, or they base that on some really old test result. There is no excuse now. You can get this in the mail if you want, and know for sure in the comfort and privacy of your own home. Its good peace of mind. And if you meet someone new and you are planning on playing around, its an easy and cheap thing to do to know where you guys stand. It builds trust right off the bat. Being safe is not just about wearing a condom. Its a combination of many things like trust, knowing the person, closeness, and being a good judge of character. Now on top of that you can keep up with your HIV status on a regular basis. :)

Guys, GUYS! This is a total game changer as far as STD/STI screening and safe sex are concerned. Like, a “we’re living in the future!” kind of game changer.

Get tested! It’s easy to do in your own home now!

ponyo-and-sosuke:

rock-flag-and-jerkface:

THIS IS THE CUTEST THING EVER

they both look a little nervous about what the other one might write

then just the biggest smiles when they are reassured yet again how much they just love each other

I’m actually jealous rn

fragileclara:

greybies:

who even came up with the word motherfucker in the first place?

oedipus